Take Your Child to Work Day 2020 Goes Risk Management

This year, AssetWorks LLC created our first ever “Take Your Child to Work Day” Risk Management Workbook to help the children of risk management professionals learn a little bit more about what their parents do each day!

From big bad wolves to convective storms, here’s a look at some of the great artwork we received after sharing it to our customers and contacts. If you’re looking for a fun activity for some small human in your life, feel free to download our workbook here— it’s never too late to learn, puzzle out, play and share.





Brooks shows here it’s possible to find a bright side in a catastrophe, with his surfer hanging ten in this tsunami. (WARNING: do not attempt this at home, folks. This will not be the epic wave you’ve been waiting for.)







Adam’s got all the bases covered in his convective storm illustration. While our current convective storm risk models don’t include alien invasion, we like that Adam is thinking ahead.







Riley helps demonstrate with colorful precision how houses of sticks are at higher risk for lupine-caused wind damage than brick structures.







Riley also shares with us how she’s currently spending her time time social distancing — quality time with family.







Maddix shows us how to keep a cool head during another risk event– a tornado…







Reagan adds extra flair to this tornado scene by using art pastels.







As you can undoubtedly see, artist Asher (age 4) demonstrates the chaos, tumultuousness and deep existential trauma associated with experiencing a severe convective storm in this quintessential work.







In Asher’s second piece in his collection, influenced by the abstract style of Picasso combined with the expressionism of Jackson Pollock, we see the unity of family in the aftermath of risk event.







Sophia decided to tackle the antagonist of our risk management coloring section, the Big Bad Wolf. This image is no doubt in the insurance company’s property risk management system as an attachment to the building history of several straw and wood structures now scheduled for replacement. Hopefully, the owners will take their insurance payment and decide to upgrade reconstruction to a brick structure, where they will also enjoy lower insurance premiums.





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